Hey! So I often get questions from some of you who want to learn how to play the violin. This seems like a good time to answer the most burning question of them all!

While there’s no way for me to be entirely specific, I’ll try to answer that to the best of my ability. Now, some of you might not know how even to begin. Many others have a tough time mustering up the money to pay for the lessons. And I understand, not everyone can find the time to work with a teacher, but that is the ideal route to learning violin.

So how long does it take to learn violin?

With the right resources and daily practice, you can become great at playing the violin in 3 to 5 years. But you can pick up tunes within three months. It should be noted that learning how to play the violin is rather difficult so if you’re learning to play your first instrument, you might want to start with something easier.

What I am going to do is walk you through some practical advice for anyone who wants to learn violin.

Violin Playing Requires Patience

There is no denying the fact that it is the toughest instrument to master. But if you have the dedication to learn it, it won’t take long for you to get good at it. You will have learned to cramp and play various tunes within six months if you can give an hour of practice to it every day.

The exact time depends upon the passion, dedication, and will power of learner. This hard work pays off spectacularly within a couple of years. But you have to commit your time and energy toward achieving it.

Despite it all, I had the toughest time my first few months of learning violin. I was far from graceful, and it sounded like a dinosaur screeching in pain every time I played. The neighbors often came begging, telling me to stop practicing at odd hours of the day and night.

Thankfully I stuck with it, and now those days of horror are long gone, my family and my neighbors enjoy my playing the violin. And that’s what qualifies me to offer you some fantastic violin learning tips.

Ps Check out my guide on the best instrument to learn for a child.

Violin Learning Tips For Beginners

Learning a new instrument takes time and struggle, but everybody can do it. Nevertheless, you don’t want to get disheartened early on, so here are a few pieces of advice for keeping your keenness.

  • Buy a chromatic tuner and use it every time you practice. It will ensure that your violin is in tune. An out-of-tune violin is a torture device of sorts; it’s tough to play (and impossible to listen to).
  • Learn how to tune your violin strings as soon as you start playing it.
  • Figure out how to clean, store, and look after your violin. Remember, any instrument can be ruined with neglect.

The best way to learn how to play violin depends on you. Choose a technique that will inspire you to keep at it and practice.

You can do it! I believe in you!

And if you believe that you’d be better off learning how to play the guitar, check out my guide on how it takes to learn the acoustic guitar.

Will it be difficult? Yes, without question!

playing violin

Violin, viola, or cello. That’s just the nature of bowed instruments; they are challenging to learn. These sophisticated instruments are quite sensitive, so you have to take your time to discover the right way to touch them. It will take at least 2 hours’ practice every day to help you understand its basics.

Being able to play tunes beautifully is the goal here. But give yourself a realistic timeline and plenty of practice. Are you committed to doing what it takes? Have you given yourself a realistic timeline to achieve this objective realistically? If the answer’s ‘yes,’ you will be able to make it!

Nonetheless, I wish I had known then what I know now when it comes to learning violin. Here’s what I mean:

1. You won’t sound like the ‘movie’ violins for months.

Yea, those violinists in music videos and movies make it seem so effortless. They look like total pros, in that perfect posture with a violin tucked under their chins, giving us feelings with what they are playing. That’s not a beginner by any stretch of the imagination.

The fact of the matter is that position is unnatural and takes some getting used to. The first ten times you play, your violin will come to life with a piercing screech. That will slowly turn into a buzz, and then several weeks later, you will learn the fine art to a wonderful start to your violin.

2. It’s perfectly okay for your violin to be noisy.

violin

Even trained violinists occasionally find their violin sounds scratchy and loud. Here’s a professional secret:  It depends on the way a violin is held. The sound is produced in the f-holes which are but a few inches away from your left. Some violinists even lose hearing in their left ear after many years of playing because the sound is too close by the ear.

3. Your violin needs TLC.

That’s right, a bit of tender loving care for your violin can do it a lot of good. Don’t worry, looking after your violin will become a habit over time. Some crucial tasks include changing bow hair and tuning the strings periodically. You’ll learn more as you go along.

4. Some four-year-old will always be better at violin than you.

Learning how to play an instrument is never a competition. You only have to beat yourself. There will always be geniuses and prodigies out there who will do it better. Appreciate them and move on. Others are not your competition, only you are. Don’t let it bother you. Instead, think about how you can better express yourself through music. That’s all that matters.

The Final Thought

Your best friends are other people who know this instrument. Ask them to help you fine-tune your body posture, bow hold, and the positioning of your fingers along a violin. It is a beautiful instrument, but one that challenges you… mind, body, and soul.

These are just a few things I wish I had known when I tried to learn violin. Keep these in mind and I promise you will survive… nay thrive as a beginner violin player.

Is there something you’d like to add? Let me know in the comment’s section below.

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